Great Primer on Open Source Folkways

Posted by bryanzug - 2007/03/15

A couple of weeks ago I noticed that two good friends of mine here in Seattle were cross posting on their blogs about Flash/Flex momentum and how a healthy open source governance structure might be helpful in pushing momentum even further.

My natural question — have you guys met face to face? Wanna grab some food?

So last night I met Ted Leung and Ryan Stewart for dinner down at Ivar’s on the waterfront. Great time, great view, great conversation.

Though Ted and I both work in the tech industry and have been friends since Mind Camp 1.0, I had never heard him talk about his long history with open source communities and governance (Apache, et al).

All I can say is that I learned a ton about that and distributed project/team folkways in general.

Great, great evening.



Brightcove to TiVo: Screencasting just got epic

Posted by bryanzug - 2006/05/10

Another paradigm shifting announcement yesterday in the world of web video. Online video service Brightcove inked a deal with TiVo to bring Brightcove video to TiVo’s.

From the article —

“If it’s on Brightcove, you’ll be able to watch it on your TV using TiVo,” Jeremy Alliare, Brightcove’s CEO, said in a statement.

Now, if you are unfamiliar with Jeremy, he’s the guy that created Cold Fusion, Adobe’s (formerly Macromedia’s) easy to use server scripting language and was Macromedia’ former CTO.

What this might mean for eLearning is that, if you put a video on Brightcove, depending on the details, you may also be able to distribute it to TiVo.

If this is true, mark the day — screencasting just got epic.

Thanks to Prismix (a flex blog) for calling this one out.



Some more worthwhile Sparkle discussion

Posted by bryanzug - 2005/09/15

Here are a couple of worthwhile Sparkle posts that flesh out what it is likely to mean for the industry.

First up is “Microsoft Expression Sparkle finally announced” from Cybergrain.

Some good points here, particularly regarding 3D — biggest oversite is that there is no mention of Macromedia’s Flex and, correspondingly, a misunderstanding of the current state of the Flash RIA nation.

Second post is “A Good Day To Be A Designer” on ScaryNoises.

It’s a great summary of how Microsoft taking design seriously is going to change the industry.



Sparkle — Microsoft finally takes UI design seriously

Posted by bryanzug - 2005/09/14

If you are into UI design and haven’t yet seen the video that Scoble posted on Microsoft’s Channel 9, prepare to crap your pants and go watch it.

At their Professional Developers Conference in Los Angeles today, Microsoft debuted Sparkle Interactive Designer as a part of their new Expression Suite. It’s a move that shows the Redmond crew seems to finally be taking UI design seriously.

Being a Flash web application developer, this is my home territory and I have to say, I’m impressed. Go watch the video and admit with me — the rich interface race is on and Redmond aims to represent.

Having been gearing up to begin some new Flex projects myself, Sparkle definitely is swinging for the same market (though we’ll have to wait to see if Sparkle UI’s play on non-Window’s systems).

The Scoble video shows a pretty well crafted design environment that can roll out rich 2D and 3D visuals and animations that are stored as XAML files (Microsoft’s XML format for describing interface controls for the new Longhorn OS coming next year – Ha, Ha, Ha). Looks pretty easy to bind these controls to underlying application code as well – a move to make UI designers a real part of the software development process.

As someone who’s been in this business a long time, this feels like a big change — Microsoft taking design seriously means that good tech design is not going to be isolated to companies like Apple or AdobeMedia any more.

While it may prove fateful for some of our favorite toolsets, at the end of the day, you have to admit it’s nice to get some business respect for a change.



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